Thursday, 5 of March of 2015

Profiles in Photography: Philip-Lorca diCorcia

Profiles in Photography: Philip-Lorca diCorcia

This week we’re focusing our photography profile on American photographer Philip-Lorca diCorcia. His style has changed over the years he’s been practicing and he likes to alternate between informal snapshots and iconic quality staged compositions that have a baroque theatricality. He tries to inspire his viewers to move beyond the everyday world of the banal and to view the psychology and emotional drama contained in real-life situations within his photos. In a way, his work could be considered documentary photography in that he tries to evoke a sense of the hidden reality or even the fantastical when he mixes his work within the fictional world of cinema and advertising.

Early in his career, he posed his friends and family in fictional interior tableaus which were carefully staged to look like snapshots. He later moved to taking photos of random people in urban spaces around the world, often hiding lights so that when someone passed in front of a place, the light would illuminate that person, isolating them from the others in his photo.

diCorcia’s work has been featured in galleries such as the Bibliothèque Nationale (Paris), the Museum of Modern Art (New York), and the Tate Gallery (London). He has won numerous awards for his work and has been featured in many publications. Should you get the chance to visit one of his exhibits, it is well worth the effort!

– da Bird


Weekly Wrap-Up

Weekly Wrap-Up

It’s been another fun yet busy week in the world of photography as more gear gets announced and tested in the hands of reviewers and photography pros during the run-up to spring. The major headlines for this past week have been the continuing coverage of Carnival and Mardi Gras festivals in the French and Spanish-speaking quarters of the hemisphere along with the winter storms that hit over this past week. Drones have been in the news again with the FAA pondering laws and regulations on them and considering requiring pilot licenses for using them, even for ones that can barely clear one-hundred feet.

All of these stories and more were mentioned on our Twitter feed this week. However, if you’re not following us on Twitter, we’ll recap the highlights for you below.


That’s all for this week, everyone! Have a great weekend and see you again next week!

— da Bird


Profiles in Photography: Ciril Jazbec

This week our Profile in Photography focuses on Slovenian-born photographer Ciril Jazbec who is most well-known for his diverse range of photography covering commercial projects, science and nature documentary photography, and freelance photojournalism. He has won numerous awards for his work including the Leica Oskar Barnack Award for “Waiting to Move” and acknowledgement from the Royal Photographic Society for his environmental work. Jazbec’s photos have been featured in The New York Times, GEO Germany, GEO France, Der Spiegel, The Sunday Times, La Republicca, WIRED UK, and Bloomberg Businessweek, among many others.

For the most part, his work is shot “from the hip” with very little posing when it comes to his science, nature, or photojournalism shots. His commercial photography is a bit more varied but still carries a very realistic quality. He prefers to keep things more natural, shying away from elaborate posing, staging, or camera-trickery to obtain surreal effects that some modern photographers prefer. Jazbec’s work is timeless and simple, stark and hauntingly beautiful. If you get the chance to see it, it is definitely worth the effort!

— da Bird


Weekly Wrap-Up

Weekly Wrap-Up

Another interesting week in the world of photography has come and gone with the start of Mardi Gras being the big headline across the southeastern United States this week. There have also been plenty of stories out featuring new accessories and gadgets being designed to complement the cameras and lenses showcased at CES back in January. Wedding photography reached its peak for this part of the year over the past fortnight and wedding photographers have been out offering advice on how to photo your own wedding or what to do in the “off-season” while you wait for the next spate of weddings to roll around.

All of these stories and more were mentioned on our Twitter feed this week. However, if you’re not following us on Twitter, we’ll recap the highlights for you below!


That’s all for this week, folks! Have a great weekend and we’ll see you again next week!

— da Bird


Profiles on Photography: Tom Kan

Profiles on Photography: Tom Kan

This week’s photography profile focuses on the Franco-Japanese photographer, director, and designer Tom Kan. Kan came into the world of photography from his younger days spent in design as a freelancer doing design work for the music and print industries. That freelance work eventually led him to directing music videos and television commercials where he quickly realized that learning how to manipulate cameras, play with lights and effects, and design his scenes visually was going to be very important to him as a director.

Once he had attained a high level of mastery in motion photography, he began working on his still photography where he continues to this day, honing his skills in this realm. His work has given him the opportunity to create concept borards and designs for some of the biggest feature films of the recent generation including The Matrix Reloaded and The Matrix Revolutions and his opening title sequence for Enter the Void netted him honors from the Art Directors Club of Paris, the SXSW Festival, and many other prestigious design organizations and publications.

If you get the chance to see his work, it is well worth it. His unique blend of movie magic and realism makes his photos look almost too good to be true.


Weekly Wrap-Up

Weekly Wrap-Up

It’s been another eventful week in the photography world as photojournalists rush about to cover the continuing snowfall impacting the northeastern United States. Overseas, the conflict in the Ukraine is making major headlines while out west it’s the measles outbreak that has everyone’s attention. Inside the industry, DJI’s support for micro and four-thirds has every aerial photographer buzzing and Canon’s new EOS specs has many insiders wondering if the manufacturer’s stance on mirrorless cameras is beginning to change.

All of these stories and more were covered on our Twitter feed this week. However, if you’re not following us on Twitter, we’ll recap the highlights for you below!


That’s all for this week, folks! Have a great weekend and we’ll see you again next week!

— da Bird


Profiles in Photography: Kalle Gustafsson

In this week’s photography profile, we’re focusing in on Swedish photographer Kalle Gustafsson who is an artist with a camera. He’s known for his cinematic-quality photos and the way he uses every trick at his disposal to pull off a beautiful, touching photo without having to resort to elaborate staging, expensive set-up, or computer trickery. He was doing retro before retro was cool. Gustafsson’s shots, whether in color or in black and white, have a timelessness and a vintage classic feel to them that make them stand apart from all of the more modern “hey, look, I can be retro, too” photographers relying overmuch on camera settings and computer filters.

Gustafsson got his start in photography at a young age when he upset his mother by using up all the film during a family ski trip to the Alps. He was interested in art and loved paintings, going on to experiment with building his own dark room and discovering that photography was exactly what he wanted to do with his life. When he completed school, he interned with several experienced photographers and then set out traveling for a while to build his portfolio and his skills. These days, he runs his own operations and is a very sought-after name in Europe when it comes to high-quality retro-style photos and film. If you ever get the chance to see his work, it is well worth it!


Weekly Wrap-Up

Weekly Wrap-Up

It’s been another fun week in the world of photography with plenty of action focusing on the big game between the Seahawks and the New England Patriots this past Sunday. The Boston Globe, one of our go-to sources for photojournalism, has been covering the story of the game itself as well as the post-game celebration as the Patriots return home triumphant. Also a big headline grabber this week has been the news out of Canon leaking info on their latest EOS-M3 and the release of the Nikon D5500 for the market!

All of these stories and more were covered on our Twitter feed this week. However, if you’re not following us on Twitter, we’ll recap the highlights for you below!


That’s all for this week, folks! Have a great weekend and we’ll see you again next week!

— da Bird


Profiles in Photography: Lyndon Wade

Profiles in Photography: Lyndon Wade

A while back we profiled photographer David Lindsey Wade in one of our Profiles in Photography. Today, we’re profiling his brother Lyndon in this week’s Profile in Photography!

Lyndon got his start in photography when, at 18, he was hired to do a pet-food ad in LA. The project manager, unaware that Wade wasn’t even old enough to rent a car on his own, recognized his talent regardless and offered the young man his chance to enter the field. Ever since then, Lyndon Wade has gone from post-to-post, mostly doing short-term internships for other photographers to build up his education in the craft as well as teaching himself. He is not formally trained in photography and his style reflects that lack of traditional training with its lack of traditional focus.

Wade prefers to keep things hyper-realistic and sets up his shots in an environment he controls most of the time. He is a mix of photographer, artist, set designer, and movie director with his dedication to making certain that every aspect of every shoot is set up to give him the exact effect he wants. His photography style emphasizes the outlandish and the strange and he makes heavy use of multiple compositions in order to pull off some of his more outlandish (but very awesome effects). If you ever have the chance to see his work for yourself, it is well worth the time!

— da Bird


Weekly Wrap-Up

Weekly Wrap-Up

It’s been another fun-filled and busy week in the photography world and industry this past week. Early on, photographers and photojournalists were busy capturing the snowstorm that was supposed to ravage the northeastern United States. However, the storm seems to have been slightly over-hyped (though the snow sculptures done afterwards are definitely not). Still, there’s been plenty of other news rolling in with Sports Illustrated laying off the last of its photography staff, new gear announcements from Tamron and Panasonic, and more!

All of these stories and more were featured on our news feed this week. However, if you’re not following us on Twitter, we’ll recap the highlights for you below!


That’s all for this week, folks! Have a great weekend and see you again next week!

— da Bird