Sunday, 19 of April of 2015

Profiles in Photography: Lyndon Wade

Profiles in Photography: Lyndon Wade

A while back we profiled photographer David Lindsey Wade in one of our Profiles in Photography. Today, we’re profiling his brother Lyndon in this week’s Profile in Photography!

Lyndon got his start in photography when, at 18, he was hired to do a pet-food ad in LA. The project manager, unaware that Wade wasn’t even old enough to rent a car on his own, recognized his talent regardless and offered the young man his chance to enter the field. Ever since then, Lyndon Wade has gone from post-to-post, mostly doing short-term internships for other photographers to build up his education in the craft as well as teaching himself. He is not formally trained in photography and his style reflects that lack of traditional training with its lack of traditional focus.

Wade prefers to keep things hyper-realistic and sets up his shots in an environment he controls most of the time. He is a mix of photographer, artist, set designer, and movie director with his dedication to making certain that every aspect of every shoot is set up to give him the exact effect he wants. His photography style emphasizes the outlandish and the strange and he makes heavy use of multiple compositions in order to pull off some of his more outlandish (but very awesome effects). If you ever have the chance to see his work for yourself, it is well worth the time!

— da Bird


Weekly Wrap-Up

Weekly Wrap-Up

It’s been another fun-filled and busy week in the photography world and industry this past week. Early on, photographers and photojournalists were busy capturing the snowstorm that was supposed to ravage the northeastern United States. However, the storm seems to have been slightly over-hyped (though the snow sculptures done afterwards are definitely not). Still, there’s been plenty of other news rolling in with Sports Illustrated laying off the last of its photography staff, new gear announcements from Tamron and Panasonic, and more!

All of these stories and more were featured on our news feed this week. However, if you’re not following us on Twitter, we’ll recap the highlights for you below!


That’s all for this week, folks! Have a great weekend and see you again next week!

— da Bird


Profiles in Photography: Jerry Ghionis

Profiles in Photography: Jerry Ghionis

This week we’re focusing our photography profile on world-class wedding photographer Jerry Ghionis. His work his heavily influenced by his Greek heritage as well as his Australian upbringing. He got started in photography early, receiving his first camera at fifteen. He did begin a four-year photography course immediately after finishing high school but quit after a year when he found the program ill-suited for him. Ghionis wanted to use his photography to tell stories about people, not to save the world with a single photo which seemed to be the driving force for most of his teachers at the time.

After spending a few years working in various retail camera shops, Ghionis volunteered to work for free at a local photography studio in Melbourne. Within a year, he had moved up to become the studio manager and principle photographer and soon went on to start his own business. He focused his attention on wedding photography, loving the chance to photograph couples on one of the biggest days of their lives and to use his photography to tell the story of, not only their wedding, but of how they came to fall in love with each other.

Jerry Ghionis is the Grand Master of the WPPI (the Wedding and Portrait Photographers International) and the most awarded photographer of that group. He has won their Wedding Album of the Year award eight times and is among their top five photographers worldwide. Should you be able to book him for your wedding or get the chance to see his work, it is well worth it as he is considered by Nikon to be one of the top ten wedding photographers in the world and has many other awards and decorations to his name!

— da Bird


5 Simple Romantic Photography Tips

5 Simple Romantic Photography Tips

Love is definitely in the air with Valentines just around the corner and that means it’s time to get your focus dialed in on romantic photography. Romantic photography doesn’t always mean photos that will make the more prudish in the crowd blush but it does require a bit more attention to detail and a little more work in the way of atmosphere than regular portrait photography (as well as more taste and refinement than the kind of photography many confuse with “romantic”). Don’t worry, though. We have some tips to help you capture great romantic photos without stressing yourself out!

1) Lighting is key — Low lights are romantic. You’ll want to keep things a little darker than normal and rely more heavily on candles or lights with a dimmer switch (for indoors) or do your photos at sunrise or sunset (for outdoors). You can also use lights or gels that have red, pink, or orange to soften the light in the room. Also, keep your lights (indoor or outdoor) set so they backlight the subject or scene to really enhance that romantic vibe.

2) Consider slowing the shutter speed — With lower lights, you’ll need a slightly slower shutter speed or longer exposure time. So, use a slower shutter speed and see how that works. However, keep in mind that this means you will need a very stable anchor to shoot from such as a good tripod!

3) Shallow depth-of-field — In other words, dial your focus in on the subject and blur everything out in the background! If the focus in the photo is a rose, for instance, and the background is your love’s smile, make sure the rose is in focus but that your love’s smiling face is just clear enough to be discernible. Trust me — it will work!

4) Props: use them! — Don’t be afraid to get a bit silly setting up the shoot if you can. Find or buy red velvet, a variety of white lace, other red fabrics of different textures and sheen, roses (flowers and petals if you can afford both), heart-shaped candy boxes, fake pearls or diamonds, a piano, a violin, an anvil (the world has all kinds, you know. Don’t judge). Whatever your photography subject loves, have it there and in an environment that will make them smile and laugh!

5) Relax. Deep breath. Don’t Panic — There’s nothing less romantic than someone who is upset, angry, or stressed out. So, stay calm, have fun, and relax! If you and your partner aren’t having fun capturing these photos of each other, then there’s a whole element of romance that’s going to be missing from them later on.

Capturing romance is all about capturing the perfect moment. However, you can set the stage, so to speak, with the tips outlined above!

— da Bird


Weekly Wrap-Up

Weekly Wrap-Up

It’s been another fun and busy week in the world of photography with plenty of hands-on and follow-ups about the announcements out of CES 2015 earlier this month. However, the biggest news this week had to do with getting advice and real-world stories out to amateur photographers and photography enthusiasts. Photographers and bloggers such as Skip Cohen had plenty of advice for how to resolve to make 2015 the best year yet in photography for those who are getting their start or who are wondering why they keep on with the camera work while photojournalist Scott Olson for Getty recounted his tale of capturing footage and photos from Ferguson.

All of these stories and more were featured on our Twitter feed this week. However, if you’re not following us on Twitter, we’ll recap the highlights for you below!


That’s all for this week, folks! Have a great weekend and we’ll see you again next weekend!

— da Bird


Profiles in Photography: Scott Kelby

Profiles in Photography: Scott Kelby

This week we’re focusing our photography profile on sports photographer Scott Kelby. Kelby is most known for his website Scott Kelby.com where he shares tips and techniques for editing and post-production in Photoshop and Lightroom. However, Kelby is also an avid photographer and has taken many great photos of some of the biggest names in football as well as some wonderful images of muscle cars (which he is a big fan of).

Kelby got his start in photography early on and has gone on to become a very prolific author. He has penned over 50 books aimed at photographers and writes for both his website and magazine. He is one of the top names in Photoshop advice when it comes to photography editing and his tutorials (available through his site and through YouTube) are very highly rated by photographers of all levels from novice to expert.

These days, Kelby is busy with his photography as well as running his own media business, the Kelby Media Group, and heading up the National Association of Photoshop Professionals — an association he helped to co-found. His Photoshop User magazine is well worth adding to your subscription list and his own work is definitely worth checking out should you get the chance!

— da Bird


Motion Capture Cameras and Photography

Motion Capture Cameras and Photography

One of the big trends in recent years when it comes to video and computer animations is motion capture photography. This is a very particular kind of photography where the people involved wear special suits and are confined to rooms with sensors and other gear built-in that can track their motions, track the motions and positions of the sensors in the suits relative to each other, and then feed that information into a computer so that animators and 3D riggers can, later on, take that data and use it to generate an animated sequence for a movie or television show.

3D motion capture (or “mocap” as some insiders call it) is fairly standard these days in video games and in cinematic cut-scenes contained in them. Just look at machinima projects like Red vs Blue and see how they use mocap and 3D animation to really bring their videos to life and to make the models move in ways that Bungie never intended. It’s also not unheard of in movies though there it might be used to a completely different end. One example is the way that Loki’s outfit changes in The Avengers. He goes from wearing a business-style suit to his Asgardian leathers without there being any camera cut-away or indication that there were multiple takes. The most probable way that this effect was shot was that the actor was wearing a 3D motion capture outfit and then scratch takes of him in the same scene with the suit and then the leathers were done to give the animators better data to work from. They then painted his costumes on in the “keeper” motion capture take and added the effects.

If you’re interested in getting into this kind of photography and computer animation, it’s an interesting area with a lot of room to grow so it’s definitely worth checking out!

— da Bird


Weekly Wrap-Up

Weekly Wrap-Up

It’s been another great week in the world of photography with plenty of news out of Nikon and Fujifilm about new cameras and new gear that builds on the announcements from the earlier Consumer Electronic Show in Las Vegas. We’ve also seen a lot of great guides come out this week on how to improve photography for the wintry months, capturing winter seasonal-specific photos, and looks ahead with photography plans for 2015!

All of these stories and more were covered in our Twitter feed this week. However, if you’re not following us on Twitter, we’ll recap the highlights for you below!



That’s it for this week, folks! Have a great weekend and we’ll see you again next week!

— da Bird


Profiles in Photography: David LaChapelle

Profiles in Photography: David LaChapelle

This week’s photography profile focuses on American avant-garde photographer David LaChapelle. His work spans across the industry in the fields of commercial photography, fine-art photography, music video photography, film, and more. LaChapelle is most known for his “hyper-real and slyly subversive” and “kitsch pop surrealism” style of photography. His work often conveys commentary on social issues and calls into question long-standing assumptions about social conventions and traditions. His photos have run on the covers of Vogue, Vanity Fair, GQ, Rolling Stone, and i-D and he has taken some of the most famous portraits of celebrities such as Tupac Shakur, Madonna, Eminem, Andy Warhol, Philip Johnson, Lance Armstrong, Pamela Anderson, Lil’ Kim, Uma Thurman, Elizabeth Taylor, David Beckham, Jeff Koons, Leonardo DiCaprio, Hillary Clinton, Muhammad Ali, Britney Spears, Amanda Lepore, Katy Perry, and Lady Gaga.

LaChapelle’s rise in photography began in the 1980s when he was showing his artwork in galleries in New York. There, he was discovered by none other than Andy Warhol who offered the aspiring artist a job as a photographer at Interview Magazine. From there, LaChapelle established a reputation as an artistic and respectable celebrity portrait photographer and his work was soon featured in some of the top editorial magazines of the era. Before much longer, he was leading advertising trends and creating some of the very ad campaigns that many of us remember from the 80s and 90s.

LaChapelle continued to push the envelope with his photography until 2006 when he abruptly retired and moved to an isolated part of Hawaii. These days, he prefers to spend his time shooting in galleries where he got his start. He feels that he has, in some way “been reborn…It’s just come full circle.” His work has received high praise as standing out from the crowd of current modern photographers — many of whom rely overmuch on shock and gratuitous nudity, especially in commercial works, according to Helmut Newton — and LaChapelle has been called the “Fellini of photography.” So, if you ever get the chance to see his work for yourself, it is definitely worth the time!

— da Bird


Photography News from CES 2015

Photography News from CES 2015

Last week the biggest event of the year in consumer electronics took place out in Las Vegas — CES 2015. And while most of it centered on televisions, home theater systems, driverless cars, tablets, computers, and other gadgets, there were some pretty amazing reveals from Nikon, Canon, Panasonic, and Pentax on the floor that have many of us very excited about what the rest of the year has in store from these big names in photography gear.

The first out the gate was Canon with their announced refreshes to the PowerShot line and the PowerShot ELPH series. The big news with the PowerShot line is the PowerShot SX530HS which includes a 50x optical zoom and a 100x Zoom plus — Canon’s own digital zoom technology. The SX530HS replaces the SX520HS and has very similar features and a very similar feel, making it a good update to a solid line. Next up is the PowerShot SX710 HS which replaces the PowerShot SX700 HS and packs a 30x optical zoom as well as being very pocket-friendly. The new PowerShot SX610 HS is an update to the PowerShot SX600 HS with 18x optical zoom and a sleek, slim build.

All three of these models also feature Auto Zoom, built-in WiFi, and full HD recording.

Last out of this line-up is the PowerShot N2 which has a square design, zoom lens, and a flippable touchscreen that rotates up to 180 degrees, allowing you to capture great selfies!

In the PowerShot ELPH series, Canon has announced the ELPH 160, 165, and 170. The ELPH series is aimed at the entry or novice market and seeks to compete against smartphone photography in the mobile world meaning these cameras come packed with a lot of features for a pocket-profile including optical zoom of up to 12x for the 170, a 20 MP sensor, Smart Auto mode, and a variety of artistic modes including Fisheye, Toy Camera, and Monochrome to help photographers get a particular look and feel in their casual shots.

The next big name out of the gate is Panasonic with their TZ70 and TZ57. These cameras are aimed at the travel market and feature slim profiles, great sensors, good zoom, and handy controls. The TZ70 has 30x optical zoom and a 5-axis Hybrid O.I.S.+ image stabilizer system to deal with the inevitable camera shake. It can also shoot full HD AVCHD video and has Panasonic’s 240fps Light Speed AF technology, GPS, and built-in Wi-Fi. The TZ57 has a 20x optical zoom lens and a few more megapixels than the TZ70 but is not optimized for low-light shooting and lacks the TZ70’s geotagging, Light Speed AF, and electronic viewfinder but does come with a tilting LCD screen for great selfies!

Panasonic also showcased their new SZ10 for social events with a pocket-profile that goes easily into a purse or suit jacket and comes with a 12x zoom range and built-in WiFi. In their rugged line-up, they unveiled the FT30 which comes with a 4x 25-100mm equivalent lens, is waterproof up to 8 meters, shockproof up to 1.5 meters, freezeproof up to -10, and dustproof. It also has some nice features such as Creative Panorama, Time Lapse, Advanced Underwater to correct for color shifts underwater, and a Torch Light for dark settings.

Third in line is Pentax with their entry-level DSLR the Pentax K-S1. This line is slated to launch in the spring and is a APS-C format DSLR. Pentax was a bit stingy with details but did say that three lenses would be launched for this line: a 18-50mm lens and a super-telephoto as well as a large-diameter telephoto lens.

Last but certainly not least is Nikon with the D5500 aimed at advanced beginners — photographers who are still learning but eager to make strides in creativity and to experiment a bit. The D5500 is the first Nikon camera to feature a touch-screen control panel — a feature considered standard by many other camera makers — an increased ISO range going up to ISO 25,600, can shoot video in 1920 x 1080 full HD at frame rates up to 50p/60p, as well as a much improved battery life.

There will be much more news out of the photography industry over the course of the year but the news out of CES 2015 has us off to a great start!

-da Bird