Thursday, 2 of July of 2015

Weekly Wrap-Up

Weekly Wrap-Up

It’s Friday again and it’s been another great week for the photography world. This week has been filled to the brim with advice from photographers around the world as everyone shakes off the shackles of winter with the arrival of warm weather, clearer skies, and the first real hints of spring. The leaves are beginning to show up on trees, the dogwoods are blooming, and allergies are kicking off — not to mention the equinox is a’comin’ this weekend! Our Twitter feed has been filled with stories on how to capture the change in seasons as well as advice and cautions for professional photographers (especially wedding photographers) in dealing with clients and fellow photographers.

All of these stories and more were up for our Twitter followers. However, if you’re not following us on Twitter, we’ll recap the top stories for you below.


That’s it for this week, folks! Have a great weekend and we’ll see you again next week!

— da Bird


Profiles in Photography: Andrew G. Hobbs

Profiles in Photography: Andrew G. Hobbs

This week our photography profile focuses on New Zealand born portrait and fashion photographer Andrew G. Hobbs. Hobbs currently resides in London and has had his work featured in magazines such as Harper’s Bazaar, GQ, Rolling Stone, i-D, The Sunday Times Style, and Esquire. He has done portraits of some of the biggest names in show business including Kylie Minogue, Eminem, Monica Bellucci, and even members of the British royal family.

Hobbs’ photography style is very interesting. He works mostly in black-and-white. When shooting in color, he takes a very minimalist approach. Though he is shooting celebrities and some of the most famous and beautiful people in the world, he seems to shy away from using the normal photographer’s elaborate posing or costuming for portraits or celebrity shots. He keeps his colors toned down as well, evoking a nostalgic feel in his color photography that reminds one of the kinds of scenes and color schemes that were common in the late 1960s and 1970s.

Over all, his work is very interesting and very different from most other fashion or celebrity photographers. If you get the chance to see it, definitely check it out!

— da Bird


Weekly Wrap-Up

Weekly Wrap-Up

It’s been another busy week in the world of photography this past week with photographers from all over the world offering plenty of advice on how to make the adjustment from winter to spring. As the seasons change, settings, styles, and photography needs change as well. In addition to all of the helpful advice on everything from settings to time-lapses, there have been plenty of announcements rolling out about new photography equipment and accessories coming off the assembly lines to complement the big reveals showcased back at CES 2015.

All of these stories and more were covered on our Twitter feed this week. However, if you’re not following us on Twitter, we’ll recap the highlights for you below!


That’s all for this week, everyone! Have a great weekend and we’ll see you again next week!

— da Bird


Profiles in Photography: Luigi Bussolati

Profiles in Photography: Luigi Bussolati

This week our photography profile focuses on Italian photographer Luigi Bussolati, an architecture and design photographer based in both Parma and Milan where he studied at the Centro Riccardo Bauer. He has also worked in Rome where his work focused on social reporting and set photography for film, television, and theater productions.

Bussolati’s work focuses on ways of representing and expressing light. He conducted his first experiments in his project “Akh-Verso la luce” and “Genius Lucis” by researching and experimenting with artifical light and its potential for redrawing space and the landscape. His projects tend to follow an evolutionary direction as well. In Akh, he photographed places where there were no people but there were very visible signs of human intervention. In Genius Lucis, he used archeological artifacts to observe how he believed the ancients drew energy and inspiration from the link between life and death — an exploration which he continues in his work S-chiusi.

Bussolati’s work is very interesting and thought-provoking. His exhibits leave one with plenty of things to ponder. If you get the chance to see his work, it is well worth the trip!

— da Bird


Weekly Wrap-Up

Weekly Wrap-Up

It’s been another busy week in the world of photography this week with a major emphasis on gear. However, exactly one week ago, the world lost a major figure who had been a guiding light in sci-fi and tech due to his role as Spock in Star Trek when Leonard Nimoy passed away on Friday, February 27. This past week has been full of memorials dedicated to him and to his role as Spock and to the inspirational part he played in getting many people to go into the sciences, particularly fields such as physics, astronomy, and engineering.

All of these stories and more were covered in our Twitter feed this week. However, if you’re not following us on Twitter, we’ll recap the highlights for you below!


That’s all for this week, folks! Remember to set your clocks forward tomorrow night, have a great weekend, and we’ll see you again next week!

— da Bird


Profiles in Photography: Philip-Lorca diCorcia

Profiles in Photography: Philip-Lorca diCorcia

This week we’re focusing our photography profile on American photographer Philip-Lorca diCorcia. His style has changed over the years he’s been practicing and he likes to alternate between informal snapshots and iconic quality staged compositions that have a baroque theatricality. He tries to inspire his viewers to move beyond the everyday world of the banal and to view the psychology and emotional drama contained in real-life situations within his photos. In a way, his work could be considered documentary photography in that he tries to evoke a sense of the hidden reality or even the fantastical when he mixes his work within the fictional world of cinema and advertising.

Early in his career, he posed his friends and family in fictional interior tableaus which were carefully staged to look like snapshots. He later moved to taking photos of random people in urban spaces around the world, often hiding lights so that when someone passed in front of a place, the light would illuminate that person, isolating them from the others in his photo.

diCorcia’s work has been featured in galleries such as the Bibliothèque Nationale (Paris), the Museum of Modern Art (New York), and the Tate Gallery (London). He has won numerous awards for his work and has been featured in many publications. Should you get the chance to visit one of his exhibits, it is well worth the effort!

– da Bird


Weekly Wrap-Up

Weekly Wrap-Up

It’s been another fun yet busy week in the world of photography as more gear gets announced and tested in the hands of reviewers and photography pros during the run-up to spring. The major headlines for this past week have been the continuing coverage of Carnival and Mardi Gras festivals in the French and Spanish-speaking quarters of the hemisphere along with the winter storms that hit over this past week. Drones have been in the news again with the FAA pondering laws and regulations on them and considering requiring pilot licenses for using them, even for ones that can barely clear one-hundred feet.

All of these stories and more were mentioned on our Twitter feed this week. However, if you’re not following us on Twitter, we’ll recap the highlights for you below.


That’s all for this week, everyone! Have a great weekend and see you again next week!

— da Bird


Profiles in Photography: Ciril Jazbec

This week our Profile in Photography focuses on Slovenian-born photographer Ciril Jazbec who is most well-known for his diverse range of photography covering commercial projects, science and nature documentary photography, and freelance photojournalism. He has won numerous awards for his work including the Leica Oskar Barnack Award for “Waiting to Move” and acknowledgement from the Royal Photographic Society for his environmental work. Jazbec’s photos have been featured in The New York Times, GEO Germany, GEO France, Der Spiegel, The Sunday Times, La Republicca, WIRED UK, and Bloomberg Businessweek, among many others.

For the most part, his work is shot “from the hip” with very little posing when it comes to his science, nature, or photojournalism shots. His commercial photography is a bit more varied but still carries a very realistic quality. He prefers to keep things more natural, shying away from elaborate posing, staging, or camera-trickery to obtain surreal effects that some modern photographers prefer. Jazbec’s work is timeless and simple, stark and hauntingly beautiful. If you get the chance to see it, it is definitely worth the effort!

— da Bird


Weekly Wrap-Up

Weekly Wrap-Up

Another interesting week in the world of photography has come and gone with the start of Mardi Gras being the big headline across the southeastern United States this week. There have also been plenty of stories out featuring new accessories and gadgets being designed to complement the cameras and lenses showcased at CES back in January. Wedding photography reached its peak for this part of the year over the past fortnight and wedding photographers have been out offering advice on how to photo your own wedding or what to do in the “off-season” while you wait for the next spate of weddings to roll around.

All of these stories and more were mentioned on our Twitter feed this week. However, if you’re not following us on Twitter, we’ll recap the highlights for you below!


That’s all for this week, folks! Have a great weekend and we’ll see you again next week!

— da Bird


Profiles on Photography: Tom Kan

Profiles on Photography: Tom Kan

This week’s photography profile focuses on the Franco-Japanese photographer, director, and designer Tom Kan. Kan came into the world of photography from his younger days spent in design as a freelancer doing design work for the music and print industries. That freelance work eventually led him to directing music videos and television commercials where he quickly realized that learning how to manipulate cameras, play with lights and effects, and design his scenes visually was going to be very important to him as a director.

Once he had attained a high level of mastery in motion photography, he began working on his still photography where he continues to this day, honing his skills in this realm. His work has given him the opportunity to create concept borards and designs for some of the biggest feature films of the recent generation including The Matrix Reloaded and The Matrix Revolutions and his opening title sequence for Enter the Void netted him honors from the Art Directors Club of Paris, the SXSW Festival, and many other prestigious design organizations and publications.

If you get the chance to see his work, it is well worth it. His unique blend of movie magic and realism makes his photos look almost too good to be true.