Saturday, 23 of May of 2015

Profiles on Photography: Tom Kan

Profiles on Photography: Tom Kan

This week’s photography profile focuses on the Franco-Japanese photographer, director, and designer Tom Kan. Kan came into the world of photography from his younger days spent in design as a freelancer doing design work for the music and print industries. That freelance work eventually led him to directing music videos and television commercials where he quickly realized that learning how to manipulate cameras, play with lights and effects, and design his scenes visually was going to be very important to him as a director.

Once he had attained a high level of mastery in motion photography, he began working on his still photography where he continues to this day, honing his skills in this realm. His work has given him the opportunity to create concept borards and designs for some of the biggest feature films of the recent generation including The Matrix Reloaded and The Matrix Revolutions and his opening title sequence for Enter the Void netted him honors from the Art Directors Club of Paris, the SXSW Festival, and many other prestigious design organizations and publications.

If you get the chance to see his work, it is well worth it. His unique blend of movie magic and realism makes his photos look almost too good to be true.


Weekly Wrap-Up

Weekly Wrap-Up

It’s been another eventful week in the photography world as photojournalists rush about to cover the continuing snowfall impacting the northeastern United States. Overseas, the conflict in the Ukraine is making major headlines while out west it’s the measles outbreak that has everyone’s attention. Inside the industry, DJI’s support for micro and four-thirds has every aerial photographer buzzing and Canon’s new EOS specs has many insiders wondering if the manufacturer’s stance on mirrorless cameras is beginning to change.

All of these stories and more were covered on our Twitter feed this week. However, if you’re not following us on Twitter, we’ll recap the highlights for you below!


That’s all for this week, folks! Have a great weekend and we’ll see you again next week!

— da Bird


Profiles in Photography: Kalle Gustafsson

In this week’s photography profile, we’re focusing in on Swedish photographer Kalle Gustafsson who is an artist with a camera. He’s known for his cinematic-quality photos and the way he uses every trick at his disposal to pull off a beautiful, touching photo without having to resort to elaborate staging, expensive set-up, or computer trickery. He was doing retro before retro was cool. Gustafsson’s shots, whether in color or in black and white, have a timelessness and a vintage classic feel to them that make them stand apart from all of the more modern “hey, look, I can be retro, too” photographers relying overmuch on camera settings and computer filters.

Gustafsson got his start in photography at a young age when he upset his mother by using up all the film during a family ski trip to the Alps. He was interested in art and loved paintings, going on to experiment with building his own dark room and discovering that photography was exactly what he wanted to do with his life. When he completed school, he interned with several experienced photographers and then set out traveling for a while to build his portfolio and his skills. These days, he runs his own operations and is a very sought-after name in Europe when it comes to high-quality retro-style photos and film. If you ever get the chance to see his work, it is well worth it!


Weekly Wrap-Up

Weekly Wrap-Up

It’s been another fun week in the world of photography with plenty of action focusing on the big game between the Seahawks and the New England Patriots this past Sunday. The Boston Globe, one of our go-to sources for photojournalism, has been covering the story of the game itself as well as the post-game celebration as the Patriots return home triumphant. Also a big headline grabber this week has been the news out of Canon leaking info on their latest EOS-M3 and the release of the Nikon D5500 for the market!

All of these stories and more were covered on our Twitter feed this week. However, if you’re not following us on Twitter, we’ll recap the highlights for you below!


That’s all for this week, folks! Have a great weekend and we’ll see you again next week!

— da Bird


Profiles in Photography: Lyndon Wade

Profiles in Photography: Lyndon Wade

A while back we profiled photographer David Lindsey Wade in one of our Profiles in Photography. Today, we’re profiling his brother Lyndon in this week’s Profile in Photography!

Lyndon got his start in photography when, at 18, he was hired to do a pet-food ad in LA. The project manager, unaware that Wade wasn’t even old enough to rent a car on his own, recognized his talent regardless and offered the young man his chance to enter the field. Ever since then, Lyndon Wade has gone from post-to-post, mostly doing short-term internships for other photographers to build up his education in the craft as well as teaching himself. He is not formally trained in photography and his style reflects that lack of traditional training with its lack of traditional focus.

Wade prefers to keep things hyper-realistic and sets up his shots in an environment he controls most of the time. He is a mix of photographer, artist, set designer, and movie director with his dedication to making certain that every aspect of every shoot is set up to give him the exact effect he wants. His photography style emphasizes the outlandish and the strange and he makes heavy use of multiple compositions in order to pull off some of his more outlandish (but very awesome effects). If you ever have the chance to see his work for yourself, it is well worth the time!

— da Bird


Weekly Wrap-Up

Weekly Wrap-Up

It’s been another fun-filled and busy week in the photography world and industry this past week. Early on, photographers and photojournalists were busy capturing the snowstorm that was supposed to ravage the northeastern United States. However, the storm seems to have been slightly over-hyped (though the snow sculptures done afterwards are definitely not). Still, there’s been plenty of other news rolling in with Sports Illustrated laying off the last of its photography staff, new gear announcements from Tamron and Panasonic, and more!

All of these stories and more were featured on our news feed this week. However, if you’re not following us on Twitter, we’ll recap the highlights for you below!


That’s all for this week, folks! Have a great weekend and see you again next week!

— da Bird


Profiles in Photography: Jerry Ghionis

Profiles in Photography: Jerry Ghionis

This week we’re focusing our photography profile on world-class wedding photographer Jerry Ghionis. His work his heavily influenced by his Greek heritage as well as his Australian upbringing. He got started in photography early, receiving his first camera at fifteen. He did begin a four-year photography course immediately after finishing high school but quit after a year when he found the program ill-suited for him. Ghionis wanted to use his photography to tell stories about people, not to save the world with a single photo which seemed to be the driving force for most of his teachers at the time.

After spending a few years working in various retail camera shops, Ghionis volunteered to work for free at a local photography studio in Melbourne. Within a year, he had moved up to become the studio manager and principle photographer and soon went on to start his own business. He focused his attention on wedding photography, loving the chance to photograph couples on one of the biggest days of their lives and to use his photography to tell the story of, not only their wedding, but of how they came to fall in love with each other.

Jerry Ghionis is the Grand Master of the WPPI (the Wedding and Portrait Photographers International) and the most awarded photographer of that group. He has won their Wedding Album of the Year award eight times and is among their top five photographers worldwide. Should you be able to book him for your wedding or get the chance to see his work, it is well worth it as he is considered by Nikon to be one of the top ten wedding photographers in the world and has many other awards and decorations to his name!

— da Bird


5 Simple Romantic Photography Tips

5 Simple Romantic Photography Tips

Love is definitely in the air with Valentines just around the corner and that means it’s time to get your focus dialed in on romantic photography. Romantic photography doesn’t always mean photos that will make the more prudish in the crowd blush but it does require a bit more attention to detail and a little more work in the way of atmosphere than regular portrait photography (as well as more taste and refinement than the kind of photography many confuse with “romantic”). Don’t worry, though. We have some tips to help you capture great romantic photos without stressing yourself out!

1) Lighting is key — Low lights are romantic. You’ll want to keep things a little darker than normal and rely more heavily on candles or lights with a dimmer switch (for indoors) or do your photos at sunrise or sunset (for outdoors). You can also use lights or gels that have red, pink, or orange to soften the light in the room. Also, keep your lights (indoor or outdoor) set so they backlight the subject or scene to really enhance that romantic vibe.

2) Consider slowing the shutter speed — With lower lights, you’ll need a slightly slower shutter speed or longer exposure time. So, use a slower shutter speed and see how that works. However, keep in mind that this means you will need a very stable anchor to shoot from such as a good tripod!

3) Shallow depth-of-field — In other words, dial your focus in on the subject and blur everything out in the background! If the focus in the photo is a rose, for instance, and the background is your love’s smile, make sure the rose is in focus but that your love’s smiling face is just clear enough to be discernible. Trust me — it will work!

4) Props: use them! — Don’t be afraid to get a bit silly setting up the shoot if you can. Find or buy red velvet, a variety of white lace, other red fabrics of different textures and sheen, roses (flowers and petals if you can afford both), heart-shaped candy boxes, fake pearls or diamonds, a piano, a violin, an anvil (the world has all kinds, you know. Don’t judge). Whatever your photography subject loves, have it there and in an environment that will make them smile and laugh!

5) Relax. Deep breath. Don’t Panic — There’s nothing less romantic than someone who is upset, angry, or stressed out. So, stay calm, have fun, and relax! If you and your partner aren’t having fun capturing these photos of each other, then there’s a whole element of romance that’s going to be missing from them later on.

Capturing romance is all about capturing the perfect moment. However, you can set the stage, so to speak, with the tips outlined above!

— da Bird


Weekly Wrap-Up

Weekly Wrap-Up

It’s been another fun and busy week in the world of photography with plenty of hands-on and follow-ups about the announcements out of CES 2015 earlier this month. However, the biggest news this week had to do with getting advice and real-world stories out to amateur photographers and photography enthusiasts. Photographers and bloggers such as Skip Cohen had plenty of advice for how to resolve to make 2015 the best year yet in photography for those who are getting their start or who are wondering why they keep on with the camera work while photojournalist Scott Olson for Getty recounted his tale of capturing footage and photos from Ferguson.

All of these stories and more were featured on our Twitter feed this week. However, if you’re not following us on Twitter, we’ll recap the highlights for you below!


That’s all for this week, folks! Have a great weekend and we’ll see you again next weekend!

— da Bird


Profiles in Photography: Scott Kelby

Profiles in Photography: Scott Kelby

This week we’re focusing our photography profile on sports photographer Scott Kelby. Kelby is most known for his website Scott Kelby.com where he shares tips and techniques for editing and post-production in Photoshop and Lightroom. However, Kelby is also an avid photographer and has taken many great photos of some of the biggest names in football as well as some wonderful images of muscle cars (which he is a big fan of).

Kelby got his start in photography early on and has gone on to become a very prolific author. He has penned over 50 books aimed at photographers and writes for both his website and magazine. He is one of the top names in Photoshop advice when it comes to photography editing and his tutorials (available through his site and through YouTube) are very highly rated by photographers of all levels from novice to expert.

These days, Kelby is busy with his photography as well as running his own media business, the Kelby Media Group, and heading up the National Association of Photoshop Professionals — an association he helped to co-found. His Photoshop User magazine is well worth adding to your subscription list and his own work is definitely worth checking out should you get the chance!

— da Bird