Friday, 29 of August of 2014

Secret Places and Photography

Secret Places and Photography

This may not be such a secret anymore considering that even I have heard of it but, if you haven’t, then it’s well work checking out. Apparently, there is a secret, abandoned subway station in NYC. Built in 1904, this station has been closed and left untouched since 1945. It’s a beautiful place, filled with hanging lights, intricate and immaculate tile-work, and has that timeless feel to it. It’s rather like the American version of Platform Nine and Three-Quarters from Harry Potter in that it is clean and looks untouched by the passage of time.

The station at City Hall closed its doors in 1945 when the new, longer trains required to meet the demand placed by commuters in the subway created large gaps between the platform and the doors at this station. Coupled with the fact that only 600 people per day embarked or disembarked at City Hall, the transit authorities decided it wasn’t worth the headache to keep it open. Plans were initially made to turn it into a museum but, as with so many things, it fell through.

Today the City Hall subway station is a place where many urban photographers cut their teeth. Picturesque, mysterious, and free of people and their habit of making any place look…well…not-so-new, this station is a great place to practice photography and to practice some of the tricks of the trade that come with urban photography — sneaking into places where one isn’t exactly supposed to be being the primary. Beyond the City Hall station itself, there are several tunnels that house murals and paintings done by street artists. However, entering those areas without approval can lead to arrest or death so we don’t recommend you visit them even if the artwork is very unique.

– da Bird

Image by: John-Paul Palescandolo and Eric Kazmirek